Saturday, January 31, 2009

Architect - Bohlin Cywinski Jackson

Impeccable adaptive re-use.

With minimal changes to the footprint, this previously dark, disorganized 1950s suburban home was redesigned to blur the boundary between indoor living and the landscape beyond. A composition of enlongated colored boxes and planar elements organizes and enlivens the house. Circulation and living spaces occupy the resulting zones between. A spine of ipe decking and a series of playful round skylights draw one from the arrival point through the house to the living spaces and the wooded site beyond. A bold linear concrete wall links a new garage and studio, forming an entry court that simultaneously welcomes visitors and screens the private bedroom spaces nearby. Teak plywood cabinets, blackened steel, and Douglas Fir contrast with more modest materials such as painted MDF panels, fiber cement siding and simple drywall. A juxtaposition of exuberance and restraint, this house provides gracious modern living both connected to the land and responsive to the needs of a young family.

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